News article on dating violence

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However, these behaviors can become abusive and develop into more serious forms of violence.

Teen dating violence [PDF 187KB] is defined as the physical, sexual, psychological, or emotional violence within a dating relationship, including stalking. Teen dating violence (physical and sexual) among US high school students: Findings from the 2013 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey. As teens develop emotionally, they are heavily influenced by experiences in their relationships.

— Dating during the teen years takes a violent turn for nearly 1 in 6 young people, a new study finds, with both genders reporting acts like punching, pulling hair, shoving, and throwing things.

The startling number, drawn from a University of Michigan Medical School survey of more than 4,000 adolescent patients ages 14 to 20 seeking emergency care, indicates that dating violence is common and affects both genders.

“These data remind us that teen relationships are not immune to violence and should encourage providers to ask adolescent patients about this important issues,” he adds.

“In addition, this could help us understand whom to target for screening and referral to, or development of, programs that could help them.” Relationships in adolescence set up patterns for adult relationships, he notes.

But the lack of data on men as both victims and aggressors means there isn’t a similar recommendation for screening them.

D., MPH, MS, the study’s lead author and a U-M clinical lecturer in the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Family Medicine.Probing deeper, the study finds that those with depression, or a history of using drugs or alcohol, have a higher likelihood to act as the aggressor or victim.The findings, from the largest-ever study of the issue in a health care setting, suggests a need for health care providers to ask both young women and men about whether their relationships have ever turned violent, and to guide them to resources.Singh also co-wrote guidance on screening for intimate partner violence for primary care providers, published in the June issue of Singh urges all teens, and those who love them, to be aware of phone and online resources that can help them identify and respond to unhealthy tendencies in their relationships – and get help when things threaten to turn violent. That includes the toll-free, 24-hour, multi-language National Domestic Violence Hotline, 800-799-SAFE and its website as well as Love is Respect, which focuses on teens.

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