Advise about dating an alcoholic

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By 1996 the programme was attracting 3.5 million viewers.The Triumph motorbike and sidecar which sped the two fat ladies around the countryside might have appeared contrived (although Paterson was a keen biker), but their kitchen-sink comedy could never have been scripted.Later she observed the budding union between Booth (“desperately needy”) and Tony Blair (“a poor sad thing with his guitar”).Later still she observed that the “wet, long-haired student” that she had known had been replaced by a man with “psychopath eyes.

One day, Louise stood at the top of the stairs: “Madam,” she said, “if you make me cook that I’ll jump.” “If you don’t Louise,” Mrs Dickson Wright retorted, “you might as well.” (Clarissa also had memories from around this time of Cherie Booth “always doing her homework in school uniform in the middle of louche Hampstead parties — she was a swot”.

Her father left his entire £2 million fortune to his brother, explaining his decision in a caustic rider to his will.

Clarissa’s mother, he wrote “never helped me and sought to alienate my children”.

Clarissa Dickson Wright was a recovering alcoholic, running a bookshop for cooks in Edinburgh when the producer Patricia Llewellyn was inspired to pair her with the equally eccentric Jennifer Paterson, then a cook and columnist at The Spectator.

The emphasis of the programme was to be on “suets and tipsy cake rather than rocket salad and sun-dried tomatoes”, the producer declared.

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